Empire Strikes Back: Why Imperialism Matters

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We live in a society where there is an unwillingness to see the unsavoury aspects of Britain’s past. Instead, we are comforted by the nostalgia of imperial notions. A recent YouGov poll found that nearly half of Brits are proud of their colonial past, while 43% think the British Empire was a “good thing”.

Britain’s post-Brexit future was recently described in civil service documents as ‘Empire 2.0’, which was quickly met with ridicule by some journalists in Africa and India. But how does British history impact today’s relationships with Commonwealth countries?

Join us to find out how have we reached this view of the past and the effect on the writing of history and our international reputation. 

£5 ADVANCE
EXETER PHOENIX, GANDY STREET, EXETER. EX4 3LS
6 P.M. – 7 P.M.


Speaker


Gajendra Singh

Senior Lecturer
History
University of Exeter


Gajendra’s research is focused upon histories of colonialism in South Asia. He has particular interests in the hybridities of Empire. His work has explored the war testimonies of Indian soldiers during the two World Wars.

He recently published a monograph on wartime soldiering identities and testimonies in the Indian Army with Bloomsbury (The Testimonies of Indian Soldiers and Two World Wars: Between Self and Sepoy) and an edited volume by Routledge (An Imperial World at War: Aspects of the British Empire’s War Experience, 1939-1945).

He has been involved in separate BBC 1, BBC Radio 4 and World Service productions exploring Indian revolutionary movements and Indian soldiers’ experiences of France during World War 1.